Tuesday, 21 February 2017

Teaser Tuesday: Glitter by Aprilynne Pike

Teaser Tuesdays is a weekly bookish meme, hosted by Ambrosia of The Purple Booker.
To play along just do the following:
  • Grab your current read
  • Open to a random page
  • Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
  • BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
  • Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

Glitter by Aprilynne Pike.

Glitter – Random House Books
for Young Readers

I see his jaw working furiously; he wants to accuse me of something, but my story is too simple for holes. The best lies always are.
— Chapter 7

Is it truly worth saving one’s life if you lose your soul in the process?
But like a cart careening down a hill, I’ve set too many processes into motion.
— Chapter 34



This book looks pretty and shallow, doesn’t t? And its protagonist invests quite a lot to be perceived as just this: a non-threatening and superficial girl. But make no mistake there is so much going on beneath the surface!
The setting can be a little confusing at first. How can there be a completely separated historical society right in the middle of a futurist country? It’s not actually that unimaginable considering what just enough money will be able to buy. The straight and consequent implementation of this second society is very entertaining. And yet even more entertaining is the downward spiral of the protagonist. Don’t get me wrong, I don’t enjoy seeing a person destroying themselves and everyone around them and I more or less understand where the protagonist is coming from. I can’t quite pinpoint the moment when my understanding of the situation flipped. At what point does the end stop justifying the means? Social study potential galore!
Be aware that there is a Cliffs of Moher like cliffhanger at the end though. Don’t say I didn’t warn you. Book two has no release date scheduled yet.

I don’t have to like a character to understand them. And I seem to read quite a few of the intentionally disliked characters lately. Have you come across a character you don’t like but who fascinates you recently? Share your finds and teasers in the comments!

Tuesday, 14 February 2017

Teaser Tuesday: Winter by Marissa Meyer

Teaser Tuesdays is a weekly bookish meme, hosted by Ambrosia of The Purple Booker.
To play along just do the following:
  • Grab your current read
  • Open to a random page
  • Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
  • BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
  • Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

Winter by Marissa Meyer.

Winter – Feiwel & Friends

“You know, if this emperor thing doesn’t work out, you might have a future career in espionage.”
He gave her a wry look. “Let’s make sure this emperor thing works out, all right?”
— Chapter 17

I can’t do anything like this. I’m broken. I’m literally broken.”
Iko settled a hand on Cinder’s shoulder. “Yeah, but broken isn’t the same as unfixable.”
— Chapter 54


Maybe today would have called for either an obviously romantic or a completely unromantic choice, but to heck with it. This is the final (so far) book in the Lunar Chronicles and a worthy conclusion to the series. The war that’s been brewing for three book finally arrives at the door of those who have been stoking it for several decades.
The author manages to tie up all retellings she’s taken up and bring them together in a suspenseful and entertaining way. I’ve loved rooting for the several characters and sharing their turbulent developments. At several point the outlook is more than dire, but the solutions always seem organic and plausible.
There is apparently going to be a graphic novel spin-off for Iko. I’m not quite sure if I’ll follow along. Not because of the medium, but because the end seemed so well-rounded to me. But you never know. Or rather: You’ll certainly get to know if I decide to give it a try.

Do you have a series that has switched mediums to expand after the end? I’m very curious if you think the switch was made successfully. Share your opinions and teasers in the comments!

Tuesday, 7 February 2017

Teaser Tuesday: The Long Game by Jennifer Lynn Barnes

Teaser Tuesdays is a weekly bookish meme, hosted by Ambrosia of The Purple Booker.
To play along just do the following:
  • Grab your current read
  • Open to a random page
  • Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
  • BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
  • Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

The Long Game by Jennifer Lynn Barnes.

The Long Game –
Bloomsbury Children’s Books

“He has a face for every occasion.”
“Whereas you,” Henry said, “just have a poker face, the appearance of which is typically a cause for concern.”
— Chapter 10

“I’m okay.”
Vivvie peered at me. “Does that mean that you’re actually okay, or that you’re stoically projecting that you will be okay at some undefined point in the future?”
— Chapter 29




As promised (threatened?) with the first book, here I am going on again with the second book about Tess Kendrick. And for all that’s worth something I loved this book! Tess is her snarky brilliant self, the stakes as high as one can imagine, political intrigues in abundance, and the lines between friend and adversary more murky than ever.
Such a fun and at the same time nerve-racking read. I am a little devastated that this seems to be the final book, because I am so not done ... and neither is the overarching story if you ask me. But maybe there will be another book and I just haven’t found the news yet. I don’t know how long I’ll believe this, but until there is other evidence I refuse to think that I won’t see these characters again. And if anyone n the decision-making levels should read this: PLEASE let there be another book!

Do you have a series that was unexpectedly cut short (not that  believe this is happening here lalala)? I understand that publishers must think economically, but why does it always happen to the series I like so much? Let’s hear from you in the comments!

Tuesday, 31 January 2017

Teaser Tuesday: The Thousandth Floor by Katharine McGee

Teaser Tuesdays is a weekly bookish meme, hosted by Ambrosia of The Purple Booker.
To play along just do the following:
  • Grab your current read
  • Open to a random page
  • Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
  • BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
  • Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

The Thousandth Floor by Katharine McGee.

The Thousandth Floor –
HarperTeen


“I just don’t understand why you won’t talk to me.”
“Yeah, well, sometimes it’s not about you, Avery.”
— Chapter 6

The words hung there, quietly ending the world Avery had always lived in. In the silence a new world was unfolding.
— Chapter 50





So, I hope you aren’t afraid of heights because this book will take you way up into the clouds. And down into the deepest abyss of society. You can read this as a guilty pleasure and be well entertained. Or if you’re like me you read this as a mixture between guilty pleasure, social study, and crime mystery. I made one mistake with this book in that I flipped through the book at one point and found out one of the mysteries the book sets up in the prologue (I have a talent for that, I should just rubber band the subsequent pages). I don’t know if I would have figured it out before it happened, but that way I read the story with very different eyes.
The number of characters was slightly overwhelming at the beginning, but once I had them straight and was beginning to understand how their stories were intertwined although they lived in such separated social strata it became complexly interesting. I liked how the author was able to portray these characters with their different premises and motivations.
There is one aspect that might be a red flag for some: There is a romantic implication between siblings. However, they are not blood-related, merely grew up together so I don’t actually get why this is such a big deal.

Have you ever accidentally discovered a major plot reveal without meaning to and have it change your reading of the story? Or are you a skip ahead person? Share your habits and teasers in the comments!

Tuesday, 24 January 2017

Teaser Tuesday: Three Dark Crowns by Kendare Blake

Teaser Tuesdays is a weekly bookish meme, hosted by Ambrosia of The Purple Booker.
To play along just do the following:
  • Grab your current read
  • Open to a random page
  • Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
  • BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
  • Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

Three Dark Crowns by Kendare Blake.

Three Dark Crowns –
HarperTeen

For it is too cruel otherwise, to force a queen to kill that which she loves. Her own sisters. And for her to see that which she loves come at her door like wolves, seeking her head.
— Chapter 9

“It is easy enough to come and go. A short sail to the mist and through it. My God, I feel mad just saying that aloud. Madder, knowing that it’s true.”
“Easy to come and go,” Arsinoe mutters. Easy for anyone but her, anyway.
— Chapter 11


Seeing that I don’t have any siblings I can’t say that I know about murderous tendencies towards them. But I seriously hope that even if there is a heavy animosity it won’t come to such a feud where whole circles of people are pitted against each other and groomed to ultimately kill the other sibling.
Kendare Blake is very talented in creating a world which is perfectly self-sustained. I was impressed when I read that the inspiration were queen bees and their colonies, because it definitely shows and is easily understood. I especially liked that even the language was adapted to this universe.
No one in this book is without blame ... or without an agenda. It took me a few chapters to fully embrace this quality of the story rather than fight it and look for an impeccably good character. At the same time they aren’t inherently bad. Or at least I don’t necessarily think they are. Communication certainly would have helped, but is cleverly impeded by the established culture and society. A feast if you’re interested in society and behaviour studies. It’s very much a place I would like to visit, but would also be very happy to be able to leave.

Which fictional place would you like to visit for a while but not forever? Share destinations and teasers in the comments!